Laura Gonzalez

 

The River

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(Photos above by Chih Peng Lucas Kao)

The River was perform in and around the Briggait in Glasgow on the 20th and 21st July 2014 as part of the Festival 2014.

This is the story of flow and memories told through dance, live music and song. The 150 strong cast, comprising of a choir, choral ensemble, musicians and dancers, take you on an emotional journey, the excitement of starting a new live, tinged with the pain of goodbyes. Just as a river replenishes itself, so does the culture of the city built alongside it. The River celebrates the creation of this vibrant community. Join us as we journey alongside the Clyde celebrating the River’s stories.

The River is created and performed by Barrowland Ballet’s professional ensemble, alongside a large community cast of dancers and choirs and professional musicians from across Scotland; under the artistic direction of Natasha Gilmore and in partnership with East London Dance.

Choreographer/ Director
Natasha Gilmore

Associate Artist
Candice Edmunds

Performers
Jade Adamson, Chrissie Ardill, Kai-Wen Chuang, Hailey Earlam, Salma Faraji, Lorraine Jamieson, Natalie Trewinnard, Vince Virr

Musical Director
Quee MacArthur

Musicians
Marcus Britton, Matt Clements, George Gillespie, Tom Pickles

Production Manager
Camilla O’Neill

Wonderful images by Neil Scottriver02 river03 river04 river05 river08 river09 river10 river11 river12 river13 river14 river15 river16 river17 river18 river19 river21

Reviews

Mary Brennan’s ★★★★ review in THE HERALD (22 July 2014):
‘Natasha Gilmore’s deftly choreographed promenade’
‘a blissful, Pied-Piper moment’
‘mass of resoundingly fine voices’
a collage of evocative images that touch on the river as a metaphor for life, as well as an arterial connection between cultures’
‘Quee MacArthur’s score is a joyful amalgum of world rhythms’
‘A very bouncy bunch of oldsters gets bootylicious to Bob Marley’s Concrete Jungle’

David Pollock’s ★★★★ review in THE SCOTSMAN (21 July 2014): ‘Natasha Gilmore’s choreography built in intensity wonderfully, and by the point of the mass-participatory finale, beaming smiles and damp eyes weren’t in short supply.’

Kelly Apter in THE SCOTSMAN: http://www.scotsman.com/what-s-on/theatre-comedy-dance/how-the-river-brought-tears-to-its-cast-1-3482150

A ★★★★★ review in THE PUBLIC REVIEW: ‘It will send you back onto the streets with joy in your heart and a spring in your step and a renewed pride in this wonderful place.’: http://www.thepublicreviews.com/the-river-the-briggait-glasgow/

About Me

I am an artist and writer. My recent practice performance, film, dance, photography and text, and my work has been performed, exhibited and published in many venues in Europe and the US. I have spoken at numerous conferences and events, including the Museum for the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, the Medical Museum in Copenhagen, College Arts Association and the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society. When I am not following Freud, Lacan and Marx’s footsteps with my camera or creating performance works as part of my Athenaeum Research Fellowship at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, I teach postgraduate students at Transart Institute.

I am currently immersed in an interdisciplinary project exploring knowledge and the body of the hysteric. In 2013, together with Child and Adolescent Mental Health practitioner Frances Davies, I co-edited the book ‘Madness, Women and the Power of Art’, to which I contributed a work authored with Eleanor Bowen. My book ‘Make Me Yours: How Art Seduces’ was published by Cambridge Scholars in 2016. In this text, investigates psychoanalytic approaches to making and understanding objects of seduction, including an examination of parallels between artistic and analytic practices, a study of Manolo Blahnik’s shoes as objects of desire, a disturbing encounter with Marcel Duchamp’s last work, and the creation of a psychoanalytically inspired Discourse of the Artefact, a framework enabling the circulation of questions and answers through a relational approach to artworks.