Laura Gonzalez

 

Ida

Ida-text
Image by Neil Scott

Ida (2016) is a one-to-one piece, performed at Buzzcut on Friday 8 April 2016 for 4 hours (6.30 to 10.30pm) at 10 minute intervals. Here is the programme for the festival (9MB)


Brochure cover

You are free to leave at any moment before the 10 minutes are up and I will close your version of the piece at around 10 minutes. The work is by one artist, Laura González, who will host the ghost of Freud’s most famous patient, Dora, whose real name was Ida Bauer. Ida will speak through Laura and she will tell you the story she told Freud, in the first person. You as the audience, are free to analyse her words, as Freud did, or simply listen. Between you and Ida, in the closed clinical room, there are no rules.

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Image by Laura Gonzalez

When you enter the room, a chaise longue, like a single bed, is placed at an angle on the far right corner. There is a soft light and a chair at the head of the chaise longue. There is no other furniture the space, which appears to be like a boardroom, or a study room. There are a few high windows on the back wall.

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

A young woman, wearing a white lace blouse and a long black and red skirt with a wide red belt is sitting on the chaise longue. Her dark hair is up and she appears to be from the 19th century. She is reading a book with a green cover: ‘Fragment of an analysis of a case of hysteria’ by Sigmund Freud, which he named his Dora case.

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

When you walk to the chaise longue and take your place on the chair (the only place you can sit), she lays down on the chaise, her head towards your right hand side. The crown of her head is near you and you can see from there to her feet as she lies down.

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

She sets her book down and begins to speak and tell you her story. While she does that, she plays with her reticule, a small, round, fashionable handbag in the 19th century, made of soft materials. This one is black, with embroidered red and green flowers and has a metallic clasp. While she speaks, the young woman opens and closes the metallic clasp, revealing a red satin lining. She likes to open and close the clasp (you will hear the faint sound), put her fingers inside and touch the satin while telling her story.

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Image by Julia Bauer

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Image by Julia Bauer

After your 10 minutes, she will say: ‘That’s all the time we have for today’. She will then sit up again and pick her book to continue reading Dora’s case. At this point, you must leave by the same door you entered.

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Image by Laura Gonzalez

About Me

I am an artist and writer. My recent practice performance, film, dance, photography and text, and my work has been performed, exhibited and published in many venues in Europe and the US. I have spoken at numerous conferences and events, including the Museum for the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, the Medical Museum in Copenhagen, College Arts Association and the Association for the Psychoanalysis of Culture and Society. When I am not following Freud, Lacan and Marx’s footsteps with my camera or creating performance works as part of my Athenaeum Research Fellowship at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, I teach postgraduate students at Transart Institute.

I am currently immersed in an interdisciplinary project exploring knowledge and the body of the hysteric. In 2013, together with Child and Adolescent Mental Health practitioner Frances Davies, I co-edited the book ‘Madness, Women and the Power of Art’, to which I contributed a work authored with Eleanor Bowen. My book ‘Make Me Yours: How Art Seduces’ was published by Cambridge Scholars in 2016. In this text, investigates psychoanalytic approaches to making and understanding objects of seduction, including an examination of parallels between artistic and analytic practices, a study of Manolo Blahnik’s shoes as objects of desire, a disturbing encounter with Marcel Duchamp’s last work, and the creation of a psychoanalytically inspired Discourse of the Artefact, a framework enabling the circulation of questions and answers through a relational approach to artworks.