Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens ***

Reading dates: 23 Jul 2015 — 11 Jan 2016

Dickens is undoubtedly comforting. I very much enjoyed reading Little Dorrit and am glad I continued even though Neil abandoned us reading it out loud. The first chapters were too long and we had to read them in a fragmented way, which did not work for the format, but I persevered with the story. Then, why such a low number of stars? There are some lovely characters — Amy Dorrit herself is a very special girl, a very beautiful image — and the setting of the story in the Marshalsea prison is effective and evocative. The resolution of the main narrative plot is satisfactory, even if predictable. But I thought it lacked punch. There is no Mr Micawber, no Uriah Heep and the book felt more like a book than some of the other ones in which he makes the narrative family, life companions. I will read more of his work (yes, I will attempt Bleak House and Great Expectations) because Dickens is an excellent writer from whom I learn very much. Like A Tale of Two Cities, though, it made me want to come back to my own time.